9 results for author: Solagroup


Greener Planet Organic Red Grape Juice

3 glasses of grape juice equal to 1 glass of wine for the same blood anti-clotting benefits, lower your risk of getting heart attack. 1  GREENER PLANET and VEGA LUCIA sparkling red grape juice are made from 100% BIO ORGANIC GRAPE (very good for kids). Especially, grape variety is GRENACHA, the main grape to make excellen wines in Spain. Totally no sugar, color and preservatives. 2  Ingredients of grape wine juice and grape juice are totally different. 3  FLAVONOIDS found in grape wine juice raise the level of HDL (good) cholesterol. This prevents blockage of arteries and the heart remains healthy. 4  RESVERATROL found in grape wine ...

Syrah & Shiraz

Let’s clear something up right away: Syrah and Shiraz are the exact same wine. When Syrah (Sih-Rah) arrived in Australia from its birthplace in France, Australian winemakers took to calling it Shiraz (Shi – RAZ), instead of the grape’s original name, Syrah. We like to chalk this renaming up to the Australian accentand their penchant for making many common words more fun to say, like how they call a barbecue a barbie. No matter what you call it, Syrah is one of the darkest red wines on the market. Darker than Cabernet Sauvignon, this wine is so dark that if you were to hold a glass of the wine up to the light, you’d have a very hard time ...

Aging Wine

Aging or “cellaring” a wine means that you decide to take a wine you have purchased and store it in a cool, dark place for a number of years, allowing the wine to improve as it sits in the bottle. However, most of us have no idea what wines we should age, and what wines we should drink now, but luckily there are some rules that make this decision pretty easy. The wine industry loves to talk about aging and collecting wine because drinking a really old wine has a romantic allure. An old wine gives us a way to re-experience a year that was special in our memory, maybe the year of our birth or anniversary, or drink a wine that comes from a time we ...

Chilean Wine

If there’s a country that’s been on the up in the wine world in the last few years, it has to be Chile. Wine production has gone through the roof and everyone is getting excited, including the winemakers. Boasting unrivalled wines from up and coming wine regions, quality that can’t be beaten and exceptional value for money, it’s not hard to see why Chile is the place to look. Choose from a selection of wines from Chile here. Great Value Wines Since the fall of the dictator General Pinochet in 1989, the Chilean wine industry has boomed. Thanks to much investment in vineyards and modern wineries, the Chileans have really got to grips with ...

Rhone Wine

The Rhone Valley is a key wine-producing region in the southeast of France. It follows the north–south course of the Rhone river for almost 150 miles (240km) from Lyon to the Rhone Delta (the Bouches-du-Rhône), near the Mediterranean coast. The length of the valley means that Rhone wines are the product of a wide variety of soil types and mesoclimates. The region’s wine-producing areas cover such a distance that there is a widely accepted division between its northern and southern parts. Rather neatly, they are separated by a gap of 25 miles (40 km) between the towns of Valance and Montelimar, in which almost no vines are grown. This division ...

What is Oak? Guide To Oaked & Unoaked Wines

Many wines can benefit from coming in contact with oak. Oak can enhance the color of the wine, soften and round out flavors, and impart its own unique characteristics. Almost all red wines and many white wines spend time in oak barrels before being bottled, and that’s just because winemakers have found they taste better that way. We like to think of a winemaker using oak as a chef would use salt, you use a little or a lot to either just slightly bring out other flavors, or to have the oak’s own characteristics play a more prominent role. However, just as a chef can use too much salt in a dish, so to can a winemaker use too much oak in a wine. If ...

A brief history of beer

Like wine, beer has a long history, one that’s longer than we’ll ever be able to tracer. Residue of the first known barley beer was found in a jar at the Godin Tepe excavation site in modern day Iran, presumably sitting there since someone took his or her last sip around 3400 B.C. But chances are, the first beer had been “cracked” millennia before that. So while an exact date or time for the first chug, or keg stand, or even hiccup, is not known, what is known is that beer, like bread, developed best in farm-based, agrarian societies where there was an enough grain and time for fermentation. One thing we definitely know is that ancient man ...

The Guide To Old World Wine Vs. New World Wine

The distinctions between Old World wines and New World wines are commonly misunderstood. Many people throw these terms around broadly, saying they prefer Old to New or New to Old without really knowing what the difference is between the two styles, or what makes a wine truly Old World or New World. At VinePair we don’t believe one style is better than the other, but we’re going to break down what each term means so you can better understand and use them. Old World Wine vs. New World Wine When someone uses the term Old World they are referring to wines made in countries that are considered the birthplaces of wine, basically that’s Europe and ...

7 Of The World’s Most Amazing Wine Themed Hotels

Of all the amenities a hotel can offer—who doesn’t love those incredibly expensive jars of beer nuts?—our favorite is kind of obvious: wine. Not all hotels offer it, but since concierge serving seems to be seriously upping its game, you’re seeing more and more (and finer) amenities show up in your room, or even your hands, upon arrival. The best, or most wine-crazed, hotels take it to another level, dedicating almost the entirety of the establishment to a collective love of the fruit of the vine. Of course, there are hotels in wine country—plenty, thankfully. But each of these hotels has taken the wine theme a step further, and while you ...